Author Archive: William Oliver

William Oliver is Nabateans’ editor for international economics and Middle East current affairs. He obtained his degree in History from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. While his studies focused on the Middle East in the 18th and 19th centuries, William has a long-standing interest in international finance and the political economy of development. William’s work is aimed at understanding how the Middle East integrates with the global economy, and into the wider geopolitical landscape.

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Counting the Cost of Military intervention in Egypt

Counting the Cost of Military intervention in Egypt

The recent upsurge in violence has brought Egypt back into the headlines. Over 1,000 people have been killed in the past week, mainly supporters of Muhammad Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood. Before venturing into analysis of the implications of recent events, some background might be helpful. As one might expect, the Brotherhood’s fall from power […]

Emerging Markets: Turkey Loses its Shine

Emerging Markets: Turkey Loses its Shine

What is the current state of the ‘Turkish Miracle’ and how will the recent Gezi Park protests affect Turkey’s political and economic development?

China’s Slowdown: to Stimulate, or not to Stimulate?

China’s Slowdown: to Stimulate, or not to Stimulate?

The debate over China’s growth trajectory – and whether a slowdown is on the cards – is heating up. Speaking at a press conference in Washington, Chinese finance minister Lou Jiwei said that a GDP growth rate of 6.5 percent wouldn’t be a “big problem“. Many have interpreted this as an indication of the new […]

Managing Expectations After Iran’s 2013 Elections

Managing Expectations After Iran’s 2013 Elections

The election of Hasan Rouhani to the presidency last month has been greeted as indicating a progressive turn in Iranian politics. It is of course too early to tell whether the reformist rhetoric that permeated Rouhani’s campaign will materialize into concrete action. As Iran scholar Ali Ansari argued at a Chatham House event, although labelled as a “moderate” by […]

Egypt’s Revolution Enters a New Phase

Egypt’s Revolution Enters a New Phase

Following four days of mass protests, Muhammad Morsi’s one-year presidency abruptly came to an end on Wednesday this week. The head of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court, Adly Mansour, was sworn in as interm president on Thursday. According to footage aired live on Egyptian satellite channel ONTv, (via Cairo-based news agency Mada Masr,) The interim president asserted […]

After a Year of Brotherhood Rule, What Next for Egypt?

After a Year of Brotherhood Rule, What Next for Egypt?

Today marks exactly one year since Mohammed Morsi won Egypt’s first (relatively) ‘democratic’ presidential elections. As Egypt’s economy continues its downward spiral, while political chaos and Muslim Brotherhood ineptitude remain the norm, life for most Egyptians over the past twelve months has scarcely improved. Tens of thousands of Egyptians are expected to take to the streets […]

Growth and Rebalancing: Jan Kregel on China’s Economy

Growth and Rebalancing: Jan Kregel on China’s Economy

The upheaval in Chinese interbank markets last week has prompted many to take a closer look at growth drivers and credit dynamics in China. Recent events have not come as a surprise to all, however. Some noted fund managers, such as Hugh Hendry and Jim Chanos, have been highly skeptical of the “China as the engine of global growth” […]

Protest, Politics and Paternalism in Turkey

Protest, Politics and Paternalism in Turkey

The brutal police response and inept political reaction to protests in Istanbul’s Gezi park (and later throughout Turkey) have served, among other things, to prick the Erdoğan “bubble” that has thrived in recent years. As Zeynep Korkman writes, Most observers of Turkey have been surprised by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s unwillingness to compromise with the […]